MTV Style: The Jeremy Scott / Jim Phillips / Santa Cruz Rip-Off Debacle

February 11, 2016

jeremy scott jim phillips rob brink

Full MTV Style article.

Spin article

Jim Phillips Facebook

Read More | Comments (0)

Chris Cole Talks Motivation 2, Therapy, and Life Under a Microscope

June 15, 2015

Chris Cole interview is live ...

chris cole rob brink the hundreds

Read More | Comments (0)

Post-Vans Propeller: Greg Hunt Talks Inspiration, Process & Critics

June 8, 2015

Greg Hunt interview is live ... click to read.

greg hunt rob brink propeller

Read More | Comments (0)

Nyjah & Kelle Huston's Let it Flow

December 6, 2012

Click here for my full article on ESPN ...

Read More | Comments (1)

Fred Gall: Professional skateboarder; guardian angel.

September 19, 2012

fred gall rob brink skateboarding
Fred Gall: Professional skateboarder; guardian angel.
Words: Robert Brink
Photo & Video: Dave Smith
ESPN.com June 2012.

“When I was a kid my uncle Johnny was a fireman,” says Habitat pro and X Games Real Street 2012 contender, Fred Gall. “He used to take me to the firehouse and I wanted to be a fireman too. I dunno why. I have an instinct to … well, I guess I just don’t wanna see people die or get hurt.”

It was approximately 3 AM on February 28 when Fred saw a building across the street from his hotel in Phnom Penh, Cambodia engulfed in flames when he decided to check it out.

“I was out there filming for my Real Street part with Dave Smith and Andrew Patillo,” Gall explains. “I wanted to get some crazy footage that no one else is gonna have—to have my part be different. So we skate down the street and it turns out to be a monastery. And this is a serious fire—a blazing inferno.

fred gall rob brink skateboarding

“At first, we had our digital cameras, like, ‘Film me doing a no comply in front of this fire.’ Kinda laughing about it. Then I realized that on the second and third floors there were monks trapped on the balcony and no one was doing anything about it—people were just staring.’

“Something about Freddy,” says longtime friend Dave Smith, “is that he’s seriously like an angel cast to Earth to guard the misfortunate. Somehow or another, these people always tend to be within Freddy’s vision. He could be at his worst and then into his best in a matter of seconds. At the Cambodian airport, a lady forgot her passport at the counter and he ran full steam through the airport to return it.”

“So I scaled the side of the building next to the burning one,” explains Gall. “And up top there are these long bamboo sticks that just happened to be the right length, so I made a bridge. The monks were scared to cross because it was so ghetto-rigged. Basically, you took two steps on the bamboo and someone would grab your hand and pull you in. But I got two monks down then went inside and shit is blowing up, it’s hot as hell and monks are just standing in the pitch black. I don’t know if it was for their religion or what. One was just throwing buckets of water on the flames but it wasn’t doing shit.”

“We tried to make it a little more serious to them,” says Smith, “Like, ‘Hey you gotta, get out of here.’ It seemed like they didn’t know what to do or where to go. Maybe they couldn’t see or were in shock but no one seemed scared about what was going on but the potential for disaster was right in their face.”

“I found a bucket and I put it on my head because shit was falling all over the place,” Gall continues, “and I’m screaming, ‘Where’s the women and children?’ But there are no women and children because it’s a monk monastery [laughing]. I was just in hero mode— just trying to save lives, dude. And Dave had made his way up and he’s like, ‘we gotta get outta here!’

fred gall rob brink skateboarding
“I walked into the stairway and it was engulfed in embers and smoke,” says Smith. “The only way to see was with the flash on my camera. That’s when I noticed all the monks just standing around, not knowing where to go because they couldn’t see anything.”

fred gall rob brink skateboarding
“I got down before Freddy,” Smith continues, “and I looked up and he’s crossing the bridge he made and helping three or four monks over to the safer building.”

“So after we make it down,” Gall continues, “the fire department shows up, puts out the fire and straight-up leaves. The fire engine number was 666. Not even kidding. Then I just went back to the hotel and had a beer. Like, ‘Wow that was fucking crazy.’”

“He gets pretty emotional after stuff like that,” explains Smith. “We got back to the hotel and he was in tears. He gets emotionally involved because he really cares.”

fred gall rob brink skateboarding
“Halfway back to the hotel,” says Smith, “Fred realized that he didn’t have his board. We went back to get it and sure enough this monk was standing there with it waiting for Fred. They all thanked him dearly. They were very honored that an American went for it like that.”

Throughout the years, Fred has been notorious for a lifestyle some might consider “sinful” or “wrong” or whatever the word might be. I asked him if he ever considered that his good karma for the times he has saved lives (yes there are many) balances out the bad karma that might send him straight to hell one day.

“I’ve definitely thought like that,” Gall replies, “but I would say I’ve definitely done more good than bad. Some people don’t believe in karma but I believe if you help someone, good things will come to you. And I’m really going for this Real Street thing—I wanna win something. I tried really hard. I busted my ass today getting footage. There are gnarly dudes in this contest but the way we’re going to edit it, I think we have a chance. I hope people are stoked.”

Read More | Comments (4)

Contenders: Kevin Terpening

September 7, 2012

kevin terpening rob brink skateboarding

Contenders: Kevin Terpening
Words: Robert Brink
The Skateboard Mag, May 2010

In the beginning of Markus Wyndham’s segment in H-Street’s Hokus Pokus, a narrator says, “This is Markus. You do not know him now, but you will someday.” At which point Markus proceeds to pop shuv-it 5-0 grind down a small rail. That was 1989.

Today, in 2010, there’s not a lot to say about Kevin Terpening. Not due to lack of talent or personality, but simply because he’s at that point in his skateboarding career where people are just gonna have to see for themselves. He’s the sleeper. The quiet, yet strangely quirky and mysterious fellow who, when all is said and done and he’s gone on his way, you think, “Damn, Kevin is fucking rad! People are gonna love this dude!”

This is K-Terps. You do not know him now, but you will someday …

I hear there’s some life drama going on?
Yea. I woke up and my old roommate called yelling at me. I didn’t pay the bills and his power and water got shut off. We had to scrounge some money up, so I’m kind of stressing.

At least you don’t live there anymore.
I feel bad for them because it’s my fault. I knew it was going to happen. I’m just an idiot.

Have you ever checked your credit score?
Fuck no! It would be fucked because I had a credit card once and a taxi driver stole it. He went and spent $2000 on it.

Do you have a checking account?
Yeah, but there’s no money in it because it’s all going to the $1,200 DWP bill. I went in all sad like, “I only have half the money. How about I just pay you half.” Trying to negotiate but they weren’t having it, so I told ‘em I’d be back soon.

Was this the same house where you had no toilet paper and you used the paper from your éS shoes?
Yeah. There was always a bunch of empty shoeboxes lying around, you know? We ran out of toilet paper and started using that shit, but then our toilet got clogged a bunch of times.

Is the good paper the piece that’s wrapped around the shoe or the part that’s crumpled inside the shoe?
The better part is what’s inside the shoes.

Oh. It’s softer?
Yeah, it doesn’t hurt. You know the other shit is like, wax paper. It’s all fucked up. You don’t want to try to wipe your ass with it. It depends on the shoe, though. Sometimes they have actual paper and sometimes it’s like tissue paper.

Like cheap toilet paper versus the expensive kind?
Exactly. It’s like the toilet paper in the stall in the gas station or at your high school.

kevin terpening rob brink skateboarding

You live in Scuba’s garage now?
Yeah. It’s pretty tight. We put up drywall and insulated the walls and I got a whole setup in there now. It’s pretty legit. I mean, it’s still in a garage, but it’s pretty tight.

Do you still owe him rent money?
It sucks. I just owe him one month right now and then maybe like, some bills. But I don’t have any money right now.

Have you tried to barter with him?
Like, “I’ll just mow the yard or plant some fucking flowers, you know, be the pool boy and shit.” We were talking about that but then it all just fell apart. Now I have to pay a bunch of rent money. It’s fucked up.

Ok pool boy … are you still working at Huf?
Yeah. I work there a few days a week. Just sit there and hang out with my friends.

Who are you riding for?
Alien Workshop flow. éS flow. Shit, I feel like I’m at Tampa Am right now. Val Surf skate shop in North Hollywood and Spitfire.

How did you get hooked up with Alien? Obviously being from Ohio …
When I was living there, my friend Scott got stuff from them and we skated together all the time. We made a video and then somehow they started hooking me up. I was psyched because in Ohio that’s a really big deal. It’s pretty sick to get hooked up from a company like Alien that you actually like.

Tell me about the Jet Black Crayon music video you’re in. I love it.
Me and Greg Hunt did it. Tommy Guerrero’s band had a new album come out and he picked 10 or so people all over the world to make a video for one of the songs. You could do whatever you wanted. I called off work for a few days and Greg would pick me up super early and we’d just go around skating shit on that thing. It was super fun and turned out pretty cool.

You can’t tell it’s a new video at all.
Yeah. It looks like it could’ve been an actual VHS from back in the day. We watched old videos and got ideas from them. Greg definitely knew what he was doing.

Does anyone still call you Grandpa Terps?
There were people who called me that?

Yeah. It’s your nickname.
Oh. I guess I’ve been called that. I used to be crabby but I’m not that bad anymore.

And you like sitting on stoops doing nothing?
Stoop Life! The old house we lived in had a nice little porch that we called “the stoop.” We would just sit there and drink beers all day so it kind of turned into the Stoop Life. There’s something about it … I’m backing it.

Do you have any awesome final statements to make?
Yeah. I just want everyone to stop waxing the fucking ledges so much. Because today at Marsh Park, straight out of the car, I tried to do a manual trick on the top of the box and the whole entire top was waxed and I ate shit. My fucking hip is all fucked up now because I tried to do a manual. Whatever.

And now you don’t even have a stoop to sit on with your broken hip.
I know. What the fuck? But I do have power and water so I’m psyched.

kevin terpening rob brink skateboarding

Read More | Comments (0)

Now and Then: Power Balance Bracelets

August 21, 2012

power balance dave carnie rob brink brandon biebel skateboarding

The Power Balance saga continues. As I read this new TMZ article and fondly look back on the days of Already Been Done— in particular, shooting Dave Carnie ideas for articles that he would either tell me sucked or accept and execute with genius every time—I couldn't help but also remember how we couldn't get a hold of Sheckler for a quote or two, despite multiple efforts, for an article Dave was working on.

I wanted to talk to Ryan about Power Balance, but he did not respond to my requests for an interview. According to an etnies source, Ryan was a little worried about how he would be portrayed in this article and that it might endanger his relationship with his sponsor.

- Dave Carnie

Possibly more relevant now than ever, here's "Power Balance Bracelets," by Dave Carnie.

Read More | Comments (0)

Fred Gall saves lives and enters X Games Real Street

June 10, 2012

Read it here. Unedited interviews from the article coming soon.

Read More | Comments (0)

Rob Brink Jenkem Interview

January 24, 2012

These guys were kind enough to interview me.

rob brink jenkem interview

Read More | Comments (0)

(Almost) Everyone Loves Kevin Lowry

December 4, 2011

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

(Almost) Everyone Loves Lowry
Words: Robert Brink
SBC, Fall 2011

“This is probably so boring,” says Kevin Lowry, halfway through our interview.

“Well, the Internet likes you and we’re having fun,” I say encouragingly, “so nothing else really matters does it?”

“True I guess, ” he replies.

Prior to our phone call, all I knew about Kevin was that he’s a 23-year-old Calgary resident and a skateboarder. Existing interviews and weeks of reaching out to his friends and teammates produced very little intel, so I resorted to the world’s most reliable source of factual information (insert facetiousness here)—the messageboards.

And they didn’t let me down one bit.

Dozens and dozens of threads with mentions of Kevin and some devoted entirely to him. Oddest of all—no one really talked shit on him. Is that even possible?

When your skateboarding is as relatable as Kevin’s … sure it is.

Cruising the streets and hitting everything along the way, making use of your surroundings, regardless of how crappy or obscure they may be (à la Oyola, Puleo, Barley, Busenitz, Fowler, Gonz and so on) is understandable and attainable for the average skateboarder, who, although most likely respectful of the ability of say, Danny Way, Torey Pudwill, Figgy or Daewon Song, has trouble processing their levels of gnar.

As admirable and impressive as they are, quadruple ledge combos, manual 900s, big five blocks, Mega Ramps and 21-stair rails aren’t on most skaters’ daily agendas.

Kevin Lowry is a normal kid, just like you. He lives in the middle of nowhere, just like you. He works a regular job, just like you. He might never be a big time pro driving a Benz to a private indoor TF in Southern California, just like you. He struggles with simple things, like trying to quit smoking, just like you. He isn’t jumping down El Toro, just like you aren’t. And because he’s just like you, well … that’s exactly why you like him.

“Kevin uses his mind with his skating,” says his friend Russ Milligan. “He's not trying to go to the new ledge in town and brainstorm what trick is left to do on it. He has a good eye for spots, a good trick selection and he skates really fast. That's what makes anything he comes out with so fresh.”

“I like to stay close to the ground,” Kevin says, only half joking. “I’m trying to take after Paul Shier. I still wanna be skating when I’m 36.

“I just always liked skating in back alleys and stuff,” he continues. “I’ve never seen someone backside flip a 14 in Cali—so that never really computed with me. I never really thought I would ever do or try that. Watching Torey Pudwill’s new Big Bang part, for example, doesn’t compute with me because I’d never try a kickflip back tail 360 flip out. I can’t even do frontside bigspins. I can barely switch heel. Fuck it.

“But watching something like Penal Code and realizing, ‘Oh, he 50-50’d the curb … ’ it makes sense to me. It’s not out of my realm. It’s more down-to-earth. You don’t have to go to those spots in the videos to 50-50 the curb; you can just skate like that wherever you want.

“What I find with skating,” Kevin continues, “is that if you just do what feels good it’s usually pretty spot on. There’s no way a fucking front foot flip feels good. You know … where you donkey kick the board? There’s just no way that feels nice, so why would you do it?”

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

But sometimes a trick feels a little too good. We’ve all been there. A while back Kevin was there too. He went through a pretty intense back smith phase. In fact, he had so many photos back smiths come out, that he performed a self-intervention.
“I banned myself from that trick and now I can barely land one anymore,” Kevin laments.

“I used to skate for éS and my team manager would bug me about it like, ‘Another back smith, eh?’ And I’d be like, ‘Fuck.’

“It’s fucked because I’d go skating with a photographer and they’d always be like, ‘you should back smith it.’ Then other times I’d get coaxed into doing tricks that I didn’t wanna do … not because I don’t like the trick but because I just had a back smith photo three months ago and I need to do something different.”

But no one else seems to be complaining. Hell, 10 years from now, Kevin might be one of those people we can watch back smith all day long. Kinda like a Reynolds frontside flip, a Kalis tre flip or a Malto front crook.

Lowry’s “Internet darling” status primarily consists of anonymous skate rats gushing over his video parts, pronouncing him “Calgary’s best skateboarder” or bitching about the fact that Kevin’s yet to be officially added to the Blueprint roster—many seemingly outraged that Tilt Mode’s Jon Nguyen was granted a slot first. This sort of backing might be flattering for many, the way a young schoolgirl might secretly enjoy seeing two boys fight over her, but not so much for Kevin.

“That is so awkward,” Kevin admits. “It’s like, ‘Man, Jon’s welcome ad and video come out and people are bringing me up in the comments.’

“I’ve never met Jon but Nestor [Judkins] and all those dudes tell me he’s the best and I’m sure he is. But it’s such a ‘fuck you’ to him.

“I’ve been skating for Blueprint for four years. I don’t know how long he’s been on there, maybe a year or something, but the guy’s the fucking best. He’s out there in Cali skating with Shier all the time and he’s fucking way better than me. I’m out of sight, out of mind. I’m some dude in Canadian videos that no one sees. He’s got sick full parts in Tilt Mode. People know who he is and that matters these days. I’m nothing but psyched for him. He’s fucking dope.”

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

Obviously Kevin’s humble tendencies are part of his charm, but for the people who don’t know him—why this devotion? Where does all the Lowry love come from?

“I’m paying ‘em all off,” Kevin laughs. “I’m giving up blowies.

“No, honestly, I don’t know. When I see my name pop up on the Internet, I cringe. I’m just waiting to read, ‘This guy has a small dick and he’s the biggest asshole and his push sucks and he can’t skate switch and this and this … ’

“Like, who are these Internet bandits? I’ve seen a few cool things on there but most of the shit is retarded. Like, ‘what’s your favorite truck?’ Why do people even post this shit?

“Give it a couple months and I’ll do something wrong,” Kevin foreshadows. “‘Yeah, we can no longer forgive Kevin for that for that fucking neon green t-shirt he’s wearing in line number four.’”

As cliché as it sounds, and as you may have noticed from the aforementioned back smith intervention and the Jon Nguyen incident, Kevin’s definitely his own worst critic and “constantly making mistakes.”

“I’m blowing it a lot,” Kevin admits. “You name it, man. I quit smoking cigarettes for two years and recently went to Portugal and started again. What the hell was I thinking? I quit drinking and smoking weed eight years ago because I was pretty bad when I was young—now I’m completely clean, so I don’t know why I would ever start smoking again.”

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

“Pretty bad” might be an understatement. Kevin took a liking to marijuana at age eight and began selling it at 10.

“I was drinking, smoking a ton of weed, doing mushrooms and skating all the time. I couldn’t afford boards or anything so I would sell weed to buy boards. But pretty soon I was skating less and less, then got arrested with weed on me a few times.”

Then, at age 15, Kevin got arrested again, for the last time. He had a half-pound of weed and three grand in cash on him when it happened. Because of his prior offenses, the court gave him the option for rehab, jail or a foster home.

“The thing is,” Kevin explains, “my parents never smoked weed, so they had no idea what the hell was going on, other than that they kept finding tons of weed and tons of cash. I was like, ‘Well, I’ll go to rehab because I’ll get there, show everyone that I’m clean, get out, be inconspicuous, still smoke weed and go on with my life.’

“But once I was in rehab I realized that there’s more to life than smoking and selling weed and harming people and my family. So I got sober. Withdrawals were pretty shitty. Not being able to see my family for weeks and not being able to skate was shitty. Being monitored day and night was shitty. I was in there for 10 months and when I got out I was so happy to be clean. Everything in my day was so simple now. I couldn’t even kickflip but I had nothing to do with my time, so that’s when I really started skating.

And at age 16, Kevin moved to Calgary and started skating non-stop.

Fast-forward eight years and Calgary is still home. But is that the most strategic move for a fledgling skateboarding career? Especially when the bulk of the industry is in Southern California and you ride for a British board brand?

“Dude, I have a new part coming out with them online and I don’t know anything about it,” Kevin says, “ I don’t know when it’s coming out, if it’s done … and I know it’s not a personal thing. Shier lives in LA and he’s so busy. But yeah, I would say my biggest fear is just not being present with the Blueprint dudes. I just spent five weeks in England with them, and being there, you feel a lot more a part of everything. If I could be am for Blueprint, get a check, skate and go on trips, I would be ecstatic. I don’t have any other passions in life and I’ve poured a lot into skateboarding. Life’s pretty short, so for me to just throw in the towel and not even try to go further is kind of silly. I’m not out there trying to make a mil. I know Nick [Jensen] and all those Blueprint dudes and they’re not rich. They don’t make that much money off Blueprint or even Lakai. They’re not in it for the money. That’s not why they started skating and I like that. I picture myself working a job come age 35 or whatever anyway. I know that. I’m not stupid.”

Kevin currently works at his local skate shop, The Source. Luckily, they allow him to come and go when he needs to skate and travel with his sponsors, a blessing compared to a past janitorial position he held or hunting for oil in swamps with crackheads …

“The worst job I ever had though,” Kevin explains, “was working at Seismic. It’s a company that finds oil in the ground. You put studs in the ground and carry huge cables through swamps and stuff. Then you shoot electricity into the ground through the cables to find the oil. The money is okay but you live in a tent or a hotel. You never get to leave, you work 12-hour days and all the guys out there are just like, ‘When I get paid, I’m gonna buy so much crack.’ They’re high-class crackheads that work their ass off for two weeks, make two grand and then spend it all on crack.

“There were times I was skating in downtown Calgary and a crackhead would come up to me like, “What’s up? I know you! We work together!”

“And I’m like, ‘Who the fuck … Oh my god, you look so shitty.’”

“I only held that job for a couple weeks until I realized I’m way to weak to carry cables all day. I didn’t have that ‘crack strength.’”

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

“Kevin is a good kid,” says George Cutright, Adidas team manager. “I’ve only been on one trip with him but he was the most responsible of the whole crew—barely drinking, going to bed at a reasonable hour and killing every spot. He’s got tons of pop.”

So how does a Canadian kid in the prairies of Calgary fall into the arms of a British company like Blueprint anyway?

“I went to London on a skate trip and met Tuukka Korhonen, Nick Jensen and Danny Brady,” says Kevin. “I was like, ‘Damn, these dudes are sick and this company is sick!’

“So I was starting to get halfway decent at skating and my friend was like, ‘Yeah that distributor just got Blueprint. You should try and get on there through them.’

“And I was like, ‘I don’t think I’m good enough to get free boards.’

“He was like, ‘No, seriously, go for it.’ So I did and couple months later I got some boards from the distributor and I just ran with it. It was so fucked up too because I was trying to contact Blueprint to be like, ‘Yo, thank you for the boards’ and stuff like that but the guy at the distributor was like, ‘We don’t have an email address for them ... blah, blah, blah.’

“So I just emailed info@Blueprint.com and was like, ‘Look, what’s up? I just wanna say hello and thanks for the boards.’ And I finally got a reply, which was cool. Then I went to England with a photographer from SBC and we did a Blueprint article for the mag. I stayed in touch with them all, went to Spain a couple times and skated with Chewy Cannon, who rode for them at the time, a lot.

Then Blueprint went out of business. I didn’t know Shier at the time so I didn’t really talk to him or anyone about it, And then one day I got an email from him like, ‘Hey what’s up? We’re still gonna do Blueprint. Would you still be into it?’

“Everyone on the team is so nice. I’m just so psyched that I’m even affiliated with them. Lost and Found has always been my favorite video of all time. I’ve met a lot of pros and I just find that with these dudes, hanging out and skating is so natural. It’s not like you’re in a van and they’re all wearing headphones and stuff—pretending to be friends because they have to be. It is a business at the end of the day but it is real proper and all those guys hang out all the time—not because they can all kickflip really well, but because they’re actually friends. I think that’s real important and I relate to them really well.”

rob brink levin lowry sbc skateboard canada

Ironically, despite all the love Kevin gets in skateboardland, many people outside our bubble who cross paths with him don’t immediately share the sentiment.

“One time, a few years ago,” says friend Jeff Thorburn, “a group of us, including Kevin, went out to skate the Warped Tour ramp in Calgary. Somewhere near the entrance, we had a bit of a run-in with security. Kevin hadn't said anything, but it turns out the guard just caught his eye and said to him, ‘What the fuck is that look all about?’

“I have huge eyebrows and my eyes are always half closed,” explains Kevin, “so I guess everyone always thinks that I’m really pissed off. And I’m totally not. When I was a bit younger I remember hanging out with Jeff’s friend Kelsey one day and we were talking about the worst stuff. I’m pretty opinionated so I guess I was hating a lot—I was on my period that day. And Kelsey, who I didn’t really know back then but I know now, was telling Jeff, ‘Who’s your friend that doesn’t like anything? I bumped into him and he looked all pissed off. He doesn’t like mustard, doesn’t like frontside flips, doesn’t like anything …’”

“Another funny incident, Kevin continues, was a while back when I got a job with my ex-girlfriend and I had just shaved my head. For the first few days no one there would talk to me and I had no idea why. She later told me that everyone was scared of me and thought I was about to snap. I guess I just looked mad.”

I dunno what it is. I’m just sitting there with my coffee and doing my thing. I’m really calm. I don’t really like anyone to bother me so I’m so confused at how I can come off like that. If I don’t have anything to say, I don’t talk, but I guess that makes a lot of people think you are mad.

“You have angry eyebrows,” I reply.

“Yeah,” Kevin says. “You should definitely put something about that in the interview. It’ll make it a little less boring.”

Read More | Comments (0)